Event Descriptions

Free Community Open House Events
Kiawanda Community Center

Friday, April 21, 2017

3:30 – 4:30 PM  Children’s Art Activity
Children ages 8-18 are invited to join Mark and Kim Cavatorta as they help students with a fun project.  Participants should come dressed to get messy, just in case. Mark recently retired from teaching art at Nestucca Jr. Sr High School; Kim is the former director of Community Arts Project (CAP) and is currently teaching in CAP’s art literacy program at Nestucca Valley Elementary School.

Limited to the first 12 students.  All materials are provided (donated by Nestucca Valley Elementary School, Community Arts Project, and Kim and Mark Cavatorta). Advance register encouraged (no fee); online, at birdingandblues@gmail.com or call 503-965-6247.

4:30 – 5:30 PM Chintimini Wildlife Center
The Chintimini Wildlife Center, based out of Corvallis, will bring two birds of prey to the Kiawanda Community Center. They will give an interactive presentation that will answer your burning questions about birds of prey. Find out why they have adapted to have such big eyes and large feet and talons. Chintimini will also lead the audience through interactive touch table activities that include skulls, feathers, and other wild artifacts.

6:00 – 7:30 PM Dinner and beverages will be available for purchase.  Proceeds from food benefit the Nestucca Valley Backpack Program.  

6:30 – 7:30 PM Robert Fields, Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge
Midway National Wildlife Refuge: Its History, Management, and the World’s Largest Albatross Colony

Presentations

All presentations will be held in the Kiawanda Community Center.

Click on the presentation for more information

Keynote Speaker: Paul Bannick - OWL: A Year in the Lives of North American Owls, Saturday 1:30 - 2:45 PM

Paul Bannick OWL

Presenter: Paul Bannick, Nature and Bird Photographer

Description: Paul Bannick gives bird-lovers a gorgeous photographic feast and an engaging natural history lesson, while making a compelling call to preserve the habitats that sustain these most iconic of birds. In his new latest book, Owl, Bannick features more than 200 images captured over several years of field work. Owl is a stunning journey through the lifecycle and varying landscapes that owls inhabit. You can purchase his book at: http://paulbannick.com/shop/owl-a-year-in-the-lives-of-north-american-owls/

Biography: Paul Bannick is an award-winning and widely published wildlife photographer specializing in the natural history of North America with a focus on birds and habitat. He has received the Canon Prize of the International Conservation Photography Awards, as well as first place in the “Birds and Their Habitat” category in Audubon magazine’s annual contest. He lives in Seattle; learn more at http://paulbannick.com.

Robert Fields - Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Its History, Management, and the World's Largest Albatross Colony, Friday 6:30 - 7:30 PM

Bob FieldsAlbatross

Presenter: Robert (Bob) Fields, Former President of Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Current Board Member

Description: Bob will walk us through the events leading to the creation of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Midway Atoll NWR is 1100 miles northwest of Honolulu, Hawaii and is the site of the largest breeding colony of Laysan Albatross in the world, plus breeding populations of Black-footed Albatross, Bonin Petrels, Gray-backed and Sooty Terns, as well as other resident wildlife including the endangered Hawaiian Monk Seal.  Bob will talk about the wildlife at Midway Atoll NWR with an emphasis on Albatross.

Biography: Bob grew up in western Washington and graduated from Washington State College (now Washington State University) with a degree in Wildlife Conservation. He worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Oregon before being drafted into the Army for over two years. He then served an appreciable number of management positions within the USFWS in Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, California, and Oregon before retiring in 1996.

He is now a volunteer with the National Wildlife Refuge Associate, Audubon Society of Portland, and Friends of Midway Atoll NWR. He has been to Midway Atoll NWR four times. Bob and his wife now live in Beaverton, Oregon.

Patty Newland – Beginning Birding, Saturday, 8:00AM -9:00AM

Description: In this beginning birding class, Patty Newland will teach you how to spot the differences among birds through their unique field marks and behavior, as well as where and how to watch birds. A chance to try out your new skills in the field follows the presentation.  Patty Newland is a Master Birder and nature enthusiast, whose passion goes beyond identification to include the study of bird language (what are they doing and why). She loves sharing her knowledge and bird finding skills with new and experienced birders. Patty has been leading bird walks in the Portland area as a volunteer for Portland Audubon and Metro since 2004. Since 2011, she has been co-leading Audubon Ecotours.

Beginning Birding Field Trip: Patty Newland, who is also giving a beginning birding class at the festival, will lead this field trip.  It will be an easy walk at a local birding site.  Only people who attend Laura’s indoor class may participate in this field trip.  Participation is limited.

Cristen Don - Oregon Doesn't Stop at the Beach: A Virtual Tour of Oregon's Marine Reserve Sites, Saturday 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

cristen-don

Presenter: Cristen Don, Marine Reserves Program Leader, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Description: Ever heard of a marine reserve? Or wondered what’s lurking below the surface of the ocean off our coast? Come take a virtual tour of Oregon’s five marine reserve sites – areas in our coastal waters that have been designated for conservation and scientific research. We’ll take a dive underwater at each of the sites and see what habitats and marine life call these places home. We’ll explore the scientific research being conducted and some of the innovative underwater research tools being used. Join us and see for yourself that Oregon doesn’t stop at the beach.

Explore more on the state’s Oregon Marine Reserves website at oregonmarinereserves.com

Biography: Cristen is the leader of the Marine Reserves Program at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. She and her team are responsible for the management and scientific monitoring of Oregon’s five marine reserve sites. Over the past 13 years, she has worked on a variety of ocean policy and management topics including alternative ocean energy, nearshore fisheries, and marine reserves and protected areas. Cristen has worked on the planning and implementation of Oregon’s marine reserves since 2007. She has a Bachelor’s degree in marine biology from UC Santa Cruz and a Master’s degree in marine and environmental affairs from the University of Washington. You might find her surfing off the Oregon coast or curled up with a good fiction novel.

Joe Liebezeit - Oregon’s Black Oystercatchers: Unveiling its Mysteries to Help Protect a Species of Conservation Concern, Saturday 3:00 - 4:15 PM

Joe Liebezeit

Presenter: Joe Liebezeit, Avian Conservation Program Manager, Portland Audubon

Description: Come learn about the Black Oystercatcher, a large black shorebird with a long red bill and pink legs. It is a top predator and can be found in rocky intertidal areas throughout Oregon. However, its numbers are small with only a little over 10,000 birds throughout the species range. The Audubon Society of Portland has recently spearheaded a citizen science effort monitoring the Black Oystercatcher population in Oregon building on previous efforts by USGS and USFWS. Joe will talk about Audubon’s recent efforts to estimate this vulnerable species population size in Oregon, unveil mysteries of this birds nesting behavior, and discuss efforts to minimize human disturbance to oystercatchers along the coast using knowledge from local citizens. Joe will also discuss Oregon’s system of Marine reserves and protected areas and how they can act as an important laboratory to study marine life including oystercatchers. We continue to learn more about this charismatic shorebird of conservation concern helping guide its protection.

Biography: Joe joined Portland Audubon in 2013. In his position as Avian Conservation Program Manager Joe leads Audubon’s citizen science program which includes projects ranging from songbird surveys in Portland greenspaces to seabird and oystercatcher monitoring on the coast. Joe also manages Portland Audubon’s Ocean Conservation Program which focuses on helping implement Oregon’s new system of marine reserves and increasing protections of forage fish species important to seabirds. Joe is involved in other conservation issues around the state including efforts to enhance wildlife protection at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge and in the Klamath Basin.

Joe has over 20 years’ experience as a wildlife biologist and conservationist studying birds and other wildlife in diverse habitats throughout the US and internationally. Prior to his position with Portland Audubon, Joe worked for the Wildlife Conservation Society for 12 years leveraging on-the-ground science efforts to pretoect wildlife from oil development and climate change impacts in Arctic Alaska. After growing up in suburban New Jersey, Joe received his Bachelor’s degree in Zoology from the University of New Hampshire and a Master’s Degree in Wildlife Management from Humboldt State University. Joe has lived in the northwest for nearly 20 years and in Portland since 2005. In his free time Joe enjoys family time with his wife, two daughters and pets. Joe enjoys playing and listening to music, exploring natural areas, and of course, bird watching!

Peter Pearsall - A Natural History of North American Deserts: Flora, Fauna, and Landscapes, Sunday 9:30 - 10:30 AM

Peter Pearsall

Presenter: Peter Pearsall

Description: Join naturalist Peter Pearsall for a photographic tour of some of his favorite ecoregions: North American deserts. You’ll see wonderful images of birds, insects, reptiles, flowers and scenery form his 4+ years living, working and traveling in the deserts of our continent.

Biography: Peter Pearsall is a naturalist, writer and photographer from Seattle, Washington. He grew up along the intertidal shores of Puget Sound, where he became fascinated with all aspects of the natural world from a young age. After graduating from Western Washington University in Bellingham, Peter followed the whims of curiosity and season work to northwest Nevada, Lake Tahoe, and – more recently – the central Oregon coast. Two years ago he was a Visitor Services intern with the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex; he currently serves as Public Relations Coordinator for the Oregon Coast Aquarium.

Roy Lowe - The Loss of China’s Coastal Wetlands and Impacts to Migratory Birds in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, Sunday 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Roy Lowe

Presenter: Roy Lowe, Volunteer, Global Parks/Paulson Institute

Description: As a result of rapid economic growth in China, large areas of coastal wetlands are being filled and converted to ports, cities, and industrial areas.  Loss of mudflat habitat along the Yellow Sea is impacting long distance migratory shorebirds and other waterbirds that depend on these wetlands, some of which breed in Alaska.  The East Asian-Australasian Flyway supports more migratory birds than any other flyway in the world, but is also the most threatened.  As a member of Global Parks, Roy is working with the World Wildlife Fund-Hong Kong by providing training to Chinese coastal wetland managers.  The current coastal wetland situation in China will be discussed and photographs of Asian birds being impacted will be shown.

Biography: Roy W. Lowe graduated from Humboldt State University in Arcata, California in 1977 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Wildlife Management.   Two weeks after graduating he began employment with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service where he worked for more than 37 years before retiring in January 2015.  He began his career in Decatur, Alabama assessing impacts and designing mitigation features for large-scale water development projects in the Southeastern US.  Later, Roy served as the supervisory wildlife biologist at San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex.  In 1985 he transferred to the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex where he remained for 29 years and at the time of his retirement served as the Project Leader.  Roy is currently a volunteer for Global Parks and the Paulson Institute working on coastal wetland issues in China.

Tom Carrico - How to Enjoy the Upcoming Great American Eclipse and Safely, Sunday 12:15 - 1:00 PM

Presenter: Tom Carrico, Amateur Astrophotographer

Description: Learn all about the August 21st Total Solar Eclipse, from the partial phases through the darkness of totality and back again. The mechanics of the eclipse will be explained, including its duration, where to observe it, what to expect during the approximately 2.5-hour event, how to observe it safely, some fun activities to try during the eclipse, and tips on photography. With an emphasis on safety, you will have all the knowledge and tools to thoroughly enjoy this once in a lifetime event.

Biography: Tom is an amateur astronomer and astrophotographer who has been in the hobby for over 30 years. He is a recently retired engineer from 33 years at Hewlett Packard. Tom’s work has been published in numerous magazines and books, as well as being featured on OPB’s Oregon Field Guide. He has also delivered lectures all over the West, as well as written software that helps astrophotographers optimize their equipment. With the upcoming Solar Eclipse, Tom has been busy giving safety talks and tutorials on how to enjoy and photograph the eclipse. You can see his work at www.astronomytom.com.

Field Trips to area sites

Register Now

You can find our Ethical Birding Guidelines here

            EASY:                                                               MODERATE:                                         CHALLENGING:
-young & elderly                                       -someone in good hiking condition            -someone in good hiking condition
-someone in fair hiking condition              -trails are generally in good condition       -trails are generally in good condition
-trails are generally in good condition       -increased mileage                                     -increased mileage
-very little elevation gain                           -moderate elevation gain                           -significant elevation gains

 

Friday:

Three Capes Tour, 8:00 – 3:00 PM
A 60-mile round trip takes birders along the Three Capes Scenic Route from Pacific City to Cape Meares National Wildlife Refuge and back again via an inland road. During the five-hour birding trip (plus two driving hours), the group will see views of the Pacific Ocean, bays, headlands, forests, rivers, and pastures, each a unique birding habitat. Birders can expect to see more than 50 species, including waterfowl, loons, grebes, and raptors. Stops on the northbound leg of the trip include Whalen Island, Cape Lookout State Park, Nehalem Bay and Tillamook Bay. There is a $40 fee to participate in this tour and is limited to 20 people, so register early to secure a spot. Box lunches can be purchased for $10 extra. John Rakestraw, nationally known birder, author, and naturalist, and Ram Papish from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will be our guides.  Easy; Transportation vehicle is equipped with a lift

Charter Dory Boat Excursion, 7:30 – 10:00 AM
Meet at 7:30 AM – Return (approximate) by 10:00 AM. New this year is a charter boat birding tour of the Nestucca Bay Estuary. Depending upon tide and prevailing conditions, the tour will explore the Big and Little Nestucca Rivers as well as journey to the mouth of Nestucca Bay. Along the way, your guide will assist you in spotting coastal birds in the air, on the water and along the shoreline as well as seals who are often seen casting a watchful eye as you travel through the water. Dress in layers for warmth and don’t forget your raincoat and binoculars. For this excursion, register directly with Pacific City Fishing at pacificcityfishing.com and click on the “contact” tab to leave a message or call (503) 351-9019 to register or to request further information. Participants are requested to be at the Brooten Road boat launch area just south of Pacific City by 7:30 AM. Cost is $40 per person. Unfortunately, this outing is not suitable for individuals with limited mobility due to the method of boarding the boat.

Saturday:

Trail of Two Rivers, 7:45 – 10:15 AM
Get a look at the newest addition to the Nestucca Wildlife Refuge during this field trip. The 192-acre Two Rivers Peninsula culminates at the confluence of the Nestucca and Little Nestucca Rivers and a series of trails wind through dense, mossy-covered forest and along the tidal shores of the bay. We will look for woodland songbirds, woodpeckers and shorebirds. This walk will be lead by some of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s all-stars: Roy Lowe (retired), Dawn Harris, and Jack Hurt.  Easy-Moderate +/- 3 miles

Swamp Stomp (Neskowin Marsh), 7:30 – 10:15 AM
Expert local birders lead this three-mile walk in easy terrain. you will walk along Hawk Creek as you traverse ideal habitat for sparrows, vireos, kinglets, warblers, wrens, dippers, and snipe and then along the Neskowin marsh golf course to look for a variety of ducks and shorebirds. From there, as time permits, you will take a short trail into wildlife refuge lands and along the beach. Biologists Molly Monroe and Jarod Jebousek join Neskowin resident and talented birder Ken Chamberlin. They combine their talents and familiarity with Neskowin marsh for one of the most popular trips. Easy

Salty Seabirds, 7:30 – 10:15 AM
View a variety of seabirds along the shore, on the water, and on haystack rock from locations around Cape Kiwanda. Bring a spotting scope, or we will provide some to share. On this trip, we will take an easy 1/4 mile walk down the beach, then climb up the short, diagonal sand trail up the dune to the “saddle” of the Cape (not the top!), where our expert birders will help you spot a variety of seabirds such as Tufted Puffins, many gull species, oystercatchers, scoters, etc. from behind the fence line. your guides for this walk will be Sarah Swanson and Max Smith, authors of “Must See Birds of the Pacific Northwest: Finding our Favorites in Oregon and Washington.”  Moderate-Challenging; Short steep section up to saddle of the Cape

Do You Hear What I Hear? (Birding by Ear) 8:00 – 10:30 AM
Most beginning birders identify birds by what they look like. After spending time in our lush, dense Northwest habitats, they realize our feathered friends are often easier to hear than see. This field trip will concentrate on listening for birds and identifying them by their song and call notes (but don’t worry, we will do some looking too.) Ram Papish, professional wildlife artist and well-traveled birder, will lead this walk on an easy, local trail.  Easy

Beginning Birding Class, 8:00 – 9:00 AM (Field Trip 9:00 – 11:00 AM)
In this beginning birding class, Patti Newland will teach you how to spot the differences among birds through their unique field marks and behavior, as well as where and how to watch birds. A chance to try out your new skills in the field follows the presentation.

Beginning Birding Field Trip, 9:00 – 11:00 AM
Patty Newland will lead this field trip. It will be an easy walk at a local birding spot. Only people who attend Patty’s indoor class may participate in this field trip. Participation is limited.  Easy/Moderate

See-Shorebirds, 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Participants will explore the Nestucca Bay estuary where they’ll walk along a historic dike between the Little Nestucca River and verdant pastureland where shorebirds gather on the tidal mudflats to feed. Don’t miss this chance to explore with photographer, naturalist, and devoted birder Peter Pearsall and eminent coastal birder, Joe Metzler.  Easy

Flora & Fowl, 3:30 – 5:30 PM
Dawn Harris and Jennifer Nelson with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will lead a guided walk into the Two Rivers tract of the Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The peninsula is home to a spectacular display of Erythronium revolutum (fawn lily) in the spring along with our native shrubs and forbs. We will bird as the opportunity arises and learn about the history of this magical property.

Sitka Sedge on the Edge, 3:45 – 5:45 PM
This is an opportunity to join one of the first organized walks into the newest Jewel of the Oregon State Parks, Sitka Sedge State Natural area. Located on the southwest edge of Sand Lake Estuary. Walks will be led by expert birders, State Wetland Biologist Chris Reidy, Oregon State Park Interpretive Ranger, Travis Korbe, and Ram Papish, birder and professional wildlife artist. The trail crosses a man-made dike which divides wetland and estuary environments with amazing diversity of plant and wildlife. The western side of the dike trails wind through pine forest and dune environments. The route of the walk may vary between walks to allow exploration of this wonderful new Oregon State Parks acquisition.  Easy/Moderate

Sunday:

Morning Kayak Nature Tour on the Nestucca River, 7:30 – 10:30 AM
On this early morning paddle, get up close with the wildlife of the Nestucca River and estuary with a guided kayak tour led by Nestucca Adventures, located on the marina in Pacific City. The dock allows for easy access to the river where you will travel 4.5 miles south towards the mouth of the river, or 4.5 miles upstream where the tidal river turns into slow, shallow rapids. The wildlife along with the thrill of paddling a scenic river makes this an adventure not to miss. For this field trip, register directly with Nestucca Adventures at nestuccaadventures@gmail.com or call 503-965-0060. Kayak rentals are per person, and include 30 minute set up and instruction, 2 hours on the water, a professional guide, and all necessary gear. Space is limited. If you have your own equipment, talk to Dennis about tagging along.

Trail of Two Rivers, 8:00 – 10:30 AM
Get a look at the newest addition to the Nestucca Wildlife Refuge during this field trip. The 192-acre Two Rivers Peninsula culminates at the confluence of the Nestucca and Little Nestucca Rivers and a series of trails wind through dense, mossy-covered forest and along the tidal shores of the bay. We will look for woodland songbirds, woodpeckers and shorebirds. This walk will be lead by some of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s all-stars: Roy Lowe (retired), Dawn Harris, and Jack Hurt.  Easy/Moderate +/- 3 miles

Swamp Stomp (Neskowin Marsh), 8:00 – 10:30 AM
Expert local birders lead this three-mile walk in easy terrain. you will walk along Hawk Creek as you traverse ideal habitat for sparrows, vireos, kinglets, warblers, wrens, dippers, and snipe and then along the Neskowin marsh golf course to look for a variety of ducks and shorebirds. From there, as time permits, you will take a short trail into wildlife refuge lands and along the beach. Biologists Molly Monroe and Jarod Jebousek join Neskowin resident and talented birder Ken Chamberlin. They combine their talents and familiarity with Neskowin marsh for one of the most popular trips. Easy

Salty Seabirds, 7:30 – 10:15 AM
View a variety of seabirds along the shore, on the water, and on haystack rock from locations around Cape Kiwanda. Bring a spotting scope, or we will provide some to share. On this trip, we will take an easy 1/4 mile walk down the beach, then climb up the short, diagonal sand trail up the dune to the “saddle” of the Cape (not the top!), where our expert birders will help you spot a variety of seabirds such as Tufted Puffins, many gull species, oystercatchers, scoters, etc. from behind the fence line. Your guides for this walk will be Sarah Swanson and Max Smith, authors of “Must See Birds of the Pacific Northwest: Finding our Favorites in Oregon and Washington.”   Moderate-Challenging; Short steep section up to saddle of the Cape

See-Shorebirds, 11:15 AM – 1:15 PM
Participants will explore the Nestucca Bay estuary where they’ll walk along a historic dike between the Little Nestucca River and verdant pastureland where shorebirds gather on the tidal mudflats to feed. Don’t miss this chance to explore with photographer, naturalist, and devoted birder Peter Pearsall and eminent coastal birder, Joe Metzler. Easy

Coastal Woodland Walkabout, 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Birders will navigate a unique coastal woodland forest surrounded by grasslands, wetlands, dunes, bogs, and protected beaches during this easy, 1.5-mile walk in a nearby coastal woodland. There, participants will learn about the trees, shrubs, and unique plants in the area, and pick up interesting facts about how vegetation grows in a coastal environment. Also included will be some interesting tidbits about the area’s unique local history.  Easy/Moderate

Sitka Sedge on the Edge, 11:15 – 1:30 PM
This is an opportunity to join one of the first organized walks into the newest Jewel of the Oregon State Parks, Sitka Sedge State Natural area. Located on the southwest edge of Sand Lake Estuary. Walks will be led by expert birders, State Wetland Biologist Chris Reidy, Oregon State Park Interpretive Ranger, Travis Korbe, and Ram Papish, birder and professional wildlife artist. The trail crosses a man-made dike which divides wetland and estuary environments with amazing diversity of plant and wildlife. The western side of the dike trails wind through pine forest and dune environments. The route of the walk may vary between walks to allow exploration of this wonderful new Oregon State Parks acquisition.  Moderate

Brown Pelican Landing

Photo credit Roy W Lowe

Hawk

Photo credit Ram Papish